Phillip Pantuso

The Open Road

 A musician and a wanderer at heart, Ryan Bingham has traveled the country from the rodeo circuit to the Oscars, sharing the stories along the way. 

The Road To Psych Fest

As The Brian Jonestown Massacre’s set ended at last year’s Austin Psych Fest, Christian Bland and Alex Maas of the Black Angels felt as if the festival they’d founded five years before had reached a new pinnacle. “They were a big inspiration for our band,” says Bland. “To see them play gave us a pretty good feeling of accomplishment.” Two hours later, when the lights came up and the festival was over, Bland and Maas were relieved—it was another successful Psych Fest. They then continued their 2012 US tour and immediately started planning the next festival with their partners in The Reverberation Appreciation Society, the group of four friends which produces the music festival and releases music under a record label of the same name.

Alternative Nightshifts

Whether they're at the forefront of the craft beer movement or rolling up their sleeves at vintage Skee-Ball lanes, discover three socialclubs doing nightlife with a twist.

Brewskee-Ball

E.C. Cooper warns that the Tuesday night division of Brewskee-Ball is “by far the craziest.” This particular Tuesday doubles as “Class Picture Night,” so many people at the Scoot Inn are colorfully costumed: one wears bunny ears with cat whisker appliqués, another a rainbow wig and high heels; a third dons a fullbody egg costume and gives his name as “Humpty Dump-skee.” They all take turns at the Scoot Inn’s three vintage Skee-Ball machines, rolling ball after ball up the four-foot lane as their teams cheer them on and swig $2 cans of Austin Beerworks, the league’s sponsors.

Ready for Takeoff

To the eyes of at least one generation of Austinites, Airport Boulevard, with its auto shops, generic strip malls and cracked (or absent) sidewalks, is an unlovely example of a time when city-planning turned heel on the pedestrian for the automobile. A boondocks avenue when it was built, State Highway 29 (it was rechristened Airport Boulevard in 1944) formed the western boundary of Robert Mueller Municipal Airport from 1936 until 1999, when the airport closed. Eighty-something years later, the beleaguered thoroughfare veins through the heart of an urban area with more than 1.5 million people, a population expected to double in the next 30 years. It’s not the corridor the city dreams of, but that’s quickly changing: new businesses, an ambitious redevelopment plan and community spirit are coming together to make Airport Boulevard an unlikely example of 21st century Austin values.

A Foodie Destination

The Outdoorsmen

 Arrowhead Custom Boats & Canoes

David Nichols was eight years old in 1950 when his father took him to see Kon-Tiki, a documentary by Thor Heyerdahl about his balsa wood raft expedition from Peru to the Polynesian Islands. Nichols’s explorations were limited to Waller Creek, but the film sparked a passion for water-faring adventure that never subsided. “I thought, ‘wow! You can build stuff that will take you anywhere in the world. I can do that!’”

In the early 90s, Nichols planned to enact that passion by building a boat and setting off with his family for adventures unknown. When his wife blanched at that idea, he “just started messing around with boats.” A self-taught builder and designer, he says there wasn’t much written about traditional sail-making and boatbuilding at the time, and what was available assumed a level of prior knowledge far beyond a novice autodidact.

Ben Kweller

Who’s the Boss? After 15 years in the ‘biz, Ben is, and he wouldn’t have it any other way.

Going Live: Big Orange

Music fans have always been interested in unique presentations of the live music experience. Examples abound, from the Depression-era field recordings of ethnomusicologist Alan Lomax to John Peel’s legendary BBC Radio 1 sessions, first broadcast in 1967; from the guerilla street performances that are La Blogothèque’s Take Away Shows to the backseat Black Cab Sessions in London and NPR’s Tiny Desk Concerts. The pull of live music is that it captures something ephemeral about the artist in the process of creation, a spontaneity that is smoothed out by the meticulous process of making a record or CD. The 21st century has made it easier than ever to capture and disseminate live music and video in interesting ways, and it makes sense that Austin—if it’s going to live up to its mantle as the “live music capital of the world”—would get in on the action. Here are three local outlets doing just that.

Going Live: Transistor Six

 Music fans have always been interested in unique presentations of the live music experience. Examples abound, from the Depression-era field recordings of ethnomusicologist Alan Lomax to John Peel’s legendary BBC Radio 1 sessions, first broadcast in 1967; from the guerilla street performances that are La Blogothèque’s Take Away Shows to the backseat Black Cab Sessions in London and NPR’s Tiny Desk Concerts. The pull of live music is that it captures something ephemeral about the artist in the process of creation, a spontaneity that is smoothed out by the meticulous process of making a record or CD. The 21st century has made it easier than ever to capture and disseminate live music and video in interesting ways, and it makes sense that Austin—if it’s going to live up to its mantle as the “live music capital of the world”—would get in on the action. Here are three local outlets doing just that.

Going Live: On-Airstreaming

Music fans have always been interested in unique presentations of the live music experience. Examples abound, from the Depression-era field recordings of ethnomusicologist Alan Lomax to John Peel’s legendary BBC Radio 1 sessions, first broadcast in 1967; from the guerilla street performances that are La Blogothèque’s Take Away Shows to the backseat Black Cab Sessions in London and NPR’s Tiny Desk Concerts. The pull of live music is that it captures something ephemeral about the artist in the process of creation, a spontaneity that is smoothed out by the meticulous process of making a record or CD. The 21st century has made it easier than ever to capture and disseminate live music and video in interesting ways, and it makes sense that Austin—if it’s going to live up to its mantle as the “live music capital of the world”—would get in on the action. Here are three local outlets doing just that.

The Craftsmen - Jamey Garza

 Handmade — eight artisans are beautifying Austin from the inside out.

JAMEY GARZA, Garza Design + Build

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